Culture, Life in Italy

Everyday Italy in pictures

It’s hard to get a real idea of what life is like in Italy when you only visit for vacation. Living here is very different than what I perceived Italy to be when I used to visit months at a time. Here is a glimpse of the little things about Italian life that I see everyday.

They have to-go cups for espressoIMG_0963-0.JPG

I hang dry my clothes and have to iron them everyday. It ends up being therapeutic.IMG_0968 

Tiramisu actually means pick me up. In Italy you have to whip the cream yourself, it doesn’t come pre-whipped!IMG_0967

Studying Italian, it’s definitely a tiramigiù at the momentIMG_1154-0

That car is parked there…IMG_1162

They created the seat belt to save lives. They then created the beeper to remind you to save your own life. Some don’t value their lives I suppose. I took it out and my friend was really curious as to why I would do that and gave me a strange look.IMG_0035

Making banana pancakes for the family. We all live together practically, so they just come right in 😀IMG_1146

Teaching kids in an after school program.IMG_1163-0

Updating a handwritten list to the new modern way thanks to personal use of a computer give to us (Americans) since the 1980s. In Italy personalized computers were distributed later and the use of internet is still a fairly new tool when it comes to business. IMG_0964

I’ve accepted that I live in Italy and just do without.IMG_1155-0.JPG

When the shipping costs more than the product you know you’ll just have to wait till you go home for Christmas and stuff your suitcase. IMG_1156

Tiramisu with friends. It’s a common dessert especially for summertime. IMG_1153

Stuffing ourselves into a small elevator. IMG_1152

Picking up my husband from port after 3 1/2 months away!IMG_1149

Welcome home love. Unforgettable moments.IMG_1150

Teaching kids at English camp some geography. “L’America non è sopra L’Inghilterra?”(America isn’t above England?)  io: “nooo, è lontana!”(no, it’s really far!) Same conversation I have every year. 😀IMG_1157

McDonalds in Italy is favoloso. If only they knew! Apart from the sweets, they serve pasta salad and panini! IMG_1164.JPG

Having fun with my hubs back in town. IMG_1145

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18 thoughts on “Everyday Italy in pictures”

  1. So nice to see a post from you! Gave me a little giggle over some things. Cream comes pre whipped? Who knew? The seat belt hack is something I’ve never seen before, neither in Italy nor in S.A. Yep, italy is still in the dark ages when it comes to computer use! Love the kids and the questions about geography. And the photos of friends and family. Yes, we live in Bella Italia, with all the good and bad that it contains. But I think the good outweighs the bad, don’t you?

    1. Yes I do! Mostly because I followed the man I love here so everything is magnified because it all relates to him. The seat belt thing I’ve seen in the States a few times, but never by someone over 25 😉

  2. Great post! I can appreciate so many of these things being an American expat in Italy as well. Learning to hang dry laundry and iron, living without things that use to seem like essentials, and the frustrating low moments of learning Italian. All very familiar. It is great to be reminded that there is a community of us all going through (and struggling with) the same things – even though our friends and family in the US can’t possibly understand as they think we are all living la bella vita.

  3. I am an Italian abroad, I come from Lecce and I really love your blog.
    Let me just say that Italy is not all like this.
    You always perfectly describe the social/cultural environment of Lecce, but in the big towns of the north (i.e. in Milan) people are a little bit more modern 🙂
    Anyway, thanks for your posts, reading them is a nice way to feel back “home” again.

  4. Love your post, so many things I have experienced:) the seat belt new💕
    How are you meeting expats in Lecce? Are there places to go? Anyone studying the language together?
    Looking forward to meeting expats in Lecce!

    1. Hi Linda! I’m glad you liked my post. I actually haven’t met any other expats in Lecce because I live 45min south of the city. I know a lady via facebook but that’s it. I’m sure there are some people there. I’ve ran into various elderly British people in the area who live here, but they’re not online and it was just a quick greeting like “hey you speak my language” kind of thing. Are you moving to the area?

    1. Hi Luca! Thanks, I have been taking quite a long break because life has got me tangeled! Have to prioritize at the moment, have a baby on the way 😉 Will write as soon as I can!

  5. Hi Jessica, Found your blog today and just love reading about your everyday experiences in Italy. How very fortunate you are to be able to live there and completely immerse yourself in the culture. I keep dreaming of the day I will be able to visit Italy and hopefully to have time to really experience some of the culture and people. My husband is American and I moved to America from Australia when we married.

  6. Hello! I like you article a lot and the pictures too! I agree with everything you’ve said. I have lived in Italy for about six months and now I am moving there. Next month I should be there with my fiance. Thank you for the nice article! You really made my day!

    1. Hi Luci, sorry for the late reply. That’s a very hard question and it really depends what your motivations are and where you come from. If you come from an economically developed country that works then I would never advise anyone to move to Italy. If that’s not the case and your reasons to move are apart from working or prospering then I would say yes it would be worth it temporarily.

  7. Hi so I am in a high school world literature class and our project for right now is to find out what it is like to live in the country we are studying. I am researching Italy and i was wondering if it would be okay if I were to ask you some questions? Let me know as soon as you can!

    Thanks,
    Josh

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